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Ranitidine Injection (Ranitidine Hydrochloride)

Ranitidine 50mg in 2ml Injection

Ranitidine Hydrochloride

Ranitidine Injection (Ranitidine Hydrochloride)About your medicine

The name of your medicine is Ranitidine 50mg in 2ml Injection.

It is a colourless to an almost colourless clear liquid.

Active  ingredient: Each   2ml   of  sterile   solution  for  injection   contains  50mg   of  Ranitidine   (as hydrochloride).

Inactive   ingredients: Sodium   chloride,   potassium   dihydrogen   phosphate,   anhydrous   disodium hydrogen phosphate and nitrogen in Water for Injections.

Pack size: 5 x 2ml ampoules.

Type of Medicine:

Ranitidine belongs to a group of medicines called H2 – receptor antagonists which reduce acid in your stomach.

Uses

For adults (including the elderly), Ranitidine is used to:

  • heal and stop ulcers in the stomach, or the part of the gut it empties into (the duodenum)
  • stop ulcers from bleeding
  • improve problems caused by acid in the food pipe (oesophagus) or too much acid in the stomach. Both of these can cause pain or discomfort sometimes known as ‘indigestion’, ‘dyspepsia’ or ‘heartburn
  • stop acid coming up from the stomach while under anaesthetic during an operation. For children (6 months to 18 years) Ranitidine is used to:
  1. heal ulcers in the stomach, or the part of the gut it empties into (the duodenum)
  2. heal and stop problems caused by acid in the food pipe (oesophagus) or too much acid in the stomach. Both of these can cause pain or discomfort sometimes known as “indigestion”, “dyspepsia” or “heartburn”.

Before you receive your medicine

Your doctor will make sure it is safe for you to have Ranitidine in Injection. Children should not have Ranitidine Injection. If you answer yes to any of the following questions or are not sure tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist

  • If you are allergic to ranitidine or to any other ingredients in the injection
  • If you are allergic to this type of medicine
  • If you think you may be pregnant or planning to become pregnant
  • If you are breast-feeding
  • If your kidneys are not working properly
  • If you have heart trouble
  • If you have been told you have a rare condition called porphyria

How your medicine is administered

Ranitidine Injection can be given by your doctor or nurse in one of three ways:

  • as a single injection into a muscle
  • as a slow infusion into a vein. This is where the drug is slowly given to you over a few minutes
  • as a continuous infusion into a vein.

This is where the drug is slowly given to you over a few hours.

The usual dose for an adult (including the elderly) and adolescents (12 years and older) is 50 mg every 6 to 8 hours, as a single injection into a muscle.

Different doses may also be given to you as a slow infusion or continuous infusion, depending on what condition you are being treated for.

Children and infants (6 months to 11 years):

Your doctor will give Ranitidine by a slow injection into a vein. The maximum dose is 50 mg every 6 or 8 hours. It is usually only given while your child is unable to take Ranitidine by mouth.

If you are given more Ranitidine than you should

Your doctor or nurse will give you  Ranitidine injection so it is unlikely that you will receive too much. If you think you have been given too much or have missed a dose, tell your doctor or nurse.

After you receive your medicine

Like all medicines, Ranitidine Injection can have unwanted side effects. Ranitidine has been used worldwide for more than 20 years and most people do not experience any problems.

Ranitidine Injection (Ranitidine Hydrochloride)Possible side effects:

  1. A few people can be allergic to ranitidine, although very rare, if you notice any of the following symptoms, report them immediately, sudden wheeziness or tightness in the chest, swelling with or without hives on any part of the body including eyelids, face or lips, unexplained fever, feeling faint, especially when standing upright, feeling weak and tired, or if you get another infection or notice easy bleeding or bruising during or shortly after using Ranitidine Injection.
  2. Some of the uncommon side effects reported include headache, dizziness, skin rash (red spots), kidney problems (symptoms may include changes in colour and the amount of urine passed), sickness, nausea, fever, loss of appetite with or without jaundice (yellowing of skin and whites of eyes), confusion, irregular or slowing of the heart beat (especially if the injection is given too fast), tiredness, shortness of breath, infections or bruising, which can be caused by upsets to “blood counts” and severe stomach pain which can rarely be caused by inflamed pancreas.
  3. Some rare side effects reported include, pain of muscles or joints, depression, hallucinations, involuntary movements, inflammation of blood vessels (vasculitis), hair loss (alopecia), impotence or swollen breast tissue (in men). If you are a man interference with sexual function is normally reversible and should get better once you stop taking this medicine.

If you have any of the above or other side effects, tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing this medicine

Do not use after the expiry date printed on the ampoule and carton.

Do not store above 25°C. Do not freeze.

Keep the container in the outer carton in order to protect from light. Incorrect storage may lead to discolouration of your medicine.

Do not autoclave (a method of sterilisation used in hospitals).

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

If only part used, discard the remaining solution.

Return any unused medicine to your pharmacist.

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